Welcome to the Fit Tech Plus Podcast

Welcome to the Fit Tech Plus Podcast

Pretty excited to blog about the launch of the Fit Tech Plus Podcast. It's hosted by the founder of Wellness Force Josh Trent. It’s on iTunes here, and you can leave a review here. Please do.

At this point early in December, Fit Tech Plus Podcast has done two episodes. I’ve been honored to appear on both. In Episode 1 (here), we discussed a common theme around our industry. Notably, there will be 1 billion health club members globally by 2025 — plus millions more on digital apps. What does that mean for the future of our health and fitness? We bring in the 2017 FIT-C Technology Trends Report in this premiere episode, as well as a presentation I gave in London entitled “Poised For Growth: The Future Of The Health Club Industry’s Rapid Expansion.” We try to provide some context on this idea of “The Fourth Industrial Revolution,” discuss the work of Steven Kotler and how it applies to health and fitness, and wrestle with the idea that some of the greatest products of the next 20 years haven’t even been created yet.

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A 1956 picture from NYC explains everything we're seeing now

A 1956 picture from NYC explains everything we're seeing now

I had the pleasure of traveling to a series of conferences this fall -- IHRSA’s Europe Congress in Seville, the Wexer Technology Summit in London and at IHRSA’s ChinaFit event, to name three. Mostly I was talking about the potential for growth in the fitness industry over the next 5-10 (or more) years.

Kevin Kelly has a recently released book called The Inevitable. The subhead is “Understanding The 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future.” KK nails it on the 12, and in fact -- he argues that these forces are already in play. We’re already moving towards this future. Hence, it’s inevitable (i.e. the title of the book).

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How is AI going to change fitness?

How is AI going to change fitness?

Here’s something most people probably don’t know: artificial intelligence actually debuted at a conference at Dartmouth University in 1956. Yep, 11 years after the end of WW2, artificial intelligence was on the scene. At the time, there was a lot of optimism. Some people at the conference believed robots and AI machines would be doing the work of humans by the mid-1970s. Of course, that didn’t happen -- what happened instead was that funding dried up and a period called “The AI Winter” began. That ostensibly lasted into the 2000s, when IBM’s Watson peaked a lot of interest in artificial intelligence again.

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As business models shift, leadership's gotta shift too. Right?

As business models shift, leadership's gotta shift too. Right?

Been writing a lot recently about leadership and some of its current failings. My friend Brian Solis is a master at this game; he recently wrote about some of the inherent problems with our current approaches to digital transformation.

Here’s how I see it, in the fitness industry and beyond. Let’s walk through a couple of different steps.

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Omnichannel sounds like a buzzword. It's the future, though.

Omnichannel sounds like a buzzword. It's the future, though.

We talk a lot about how the fitness industry is changing and how omnichannel -- a mix of brick and mortar and digital options -- is the path forward. In one of the last articles I posted online, I talked about how we’re thinking of “disruption” in the wrong way. Think of the music industry from 2000 to 2010. That was the prime disruption decade for music and yet, live attendance and record sales essentially tripled. So we think disruption brings down traditional means and revenue streams, but in reality -- nope it doesn’t. Digital works with traditional for a bigger, better path forward. A rising tide lifts all boats. Right

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